Courts owe more than verbal respect to the cardinal principle that punishment begins after conviction, and that every man is deemed to be innocent until duly tried and duly found guilty: J&K High Court

Courts owe more than verbal respect to the cardinal principle that punishment begins after conviction, and that every man is deemed to be innocent until duly tried and duly found guilty: J&K High Court

There is no strait jacket formula or settled rules for the use of discretion in grant or refusal of bail at the time of deciding the question of “bail or jail” in non-bailable offences. The discretion has to be based not only as per the settled law but also according the to rules and principle as laid down by the Code of Criminal Procedure and various judicial decisions. 

Deprivation of liberty must be considered a punishment, unless it can be required to ensure that an accused person will stand his trial when called upon. The courts owe more than verbal respect to the principle that punishment begins after conviction, and that every man is deemed to be innocent until duly tried and duly found guilty. From the earliest times, it was appreciated that detention in custody pending completion of trial could be a cause of great hardship. From time to time, necessity demands that some un- convicted persons should be held in custody pending trial to secure their attendance at the trial but in such cases, necessity’ is the operative test. In this country, it would be quite contrary to the concept of personal liberty enshrined in the Constitution that any person should be punished in respect of any matter, upon which, he has not been convicted or that in any circumstances, he should be deprived of his liberty upon only the belief that he will tamper with the witnesses, if left at liberty, save in the most extraordinary circumstances.

Apart from the question of prevention being the object of a refusal of bail, one must not lose sight of the fact that any imprisonment before conviction has a substantial punitive content and it would be improper for any Court to refuse bail as a mark of disapproval of the conduct of the accused whether the accused has been convicted for it or not or to refuse bail to an un- convicted person for the purpose of giving him a taste of imprisonment as a lesson.

Mehraj-ud-Din Nadroo and others Vs. State of J&K (BA No.74/2018 decided on 07.07.2018)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *